Autism and Abnormal Blood Vessels in the Brain

Researchers recently published a study in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders called “Persistent Angiogenesis in the Autism Brain: An Immunocytochemical Study of Postmortem Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum.” The study found that the brains of those with autism have “unstable blood vessels disrupting proper delivery of blood to the brain.” “Typical” brain blood vessels are stable.

The researchers conducted the study by looking microscopically at post-mortem age-matched normal brains and autistic brains. The researchers did not know which brains had had an autism diagnosis and which brains did not thus eliminating bias in their observations. The study found formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) in the brains from individuals who had had an autism diagnosis; no such angiogenesis was noted in the normal brains. The areas of the brain affected were the “superior temporal cortex (primary auditory cortex), fusiform cortex (face recognition center), pons/midbrain and cerebellum.” Specifically, the researchers found increased levels of the proteins nestin and CD34 which are markers of angiogenesis. Importantly, the study findings found that the angiogenesis was not the kind that caused the sprouting of new vessels but instead of splitting, thus causing continuous fluctuations in blood circulation.

Sources:  http://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2015/12/16/scientists-find-new-vessel-for-detecting-autism.html

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-015-2672-6?no-access=true

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